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04 December 2006 @ 10:31 am
 
A relaxing weekend. I did a little bit of work, but most of it was chilling at the apartment or catching up on sleep. My cel phone's acting up, so if you can't reach me there, call my home number.

Probably my only frustration as I get ready to tackle another week is the course application stuff. I finished sorting and ranking the portfolios over a week ago, which was nice to get out of the way, but even after I very explicitly told applicants not to pester the school about their application status, I've been getting absolutely pelted with e-mails and phone messages at the college from students doing exactly that. Last night an applicant e-mailed me in a rage (seriously, it was dripping with angst) asking why he was on the waiting list, so "Please look at my portfolio again. I feel in hell these days. Please re-mail me."

Maybe it's just a matter of me getting older and doing that cliche "man, kids nowadays are idiots" thing, but I don't recall feeling so self-entitled. Confidence is good, but some of this is just getting ridiculous.

There's that Hollywood-delivered nicety of "If you work hard, you will succeed". I really do believe in that. Seriously.

The tough part comes in understanding how much hard work that will be for some people. If you work hard and you still aren't making it, then a lot more hard work is required. There is no motto that states "Your hard work will be the same or less than anyone else who has ever succeeded". Maybe you have to work twice as hard, maybe aspects of it will come easily - no one knows. Maybe someone you know will get an easy break and you won't. Fate (if you believe in that kind of thing) doesn't state "work hard for a year" or anything specific like that. Your path is unique, even though there are tendencies we can look to as far as growth and technique.

Do the research, look at your work and be honest about where it's at. How bad do you want it? Just saying or feeling that you want it really bad is not enough. I'm not saying this to be mean. I don't think I know everything, but I have a decent idea of where my skill falls on the ladder and what I can and can't do at this point. I wish my skills were stronger, but wishing alone doesn't make them better. Blaming someone else doesn't improve them either.

It's not like a I sit around cackling like Doctor Doom raising up or destroying people's lives as they apply to get into this course. Would it be right to put this applicant's portfolio ahead of someone with higher quality material just because he complained to me? Of course it wouldn't, and I won't... but this idea that I should because he e-mailed me makes me bristle a bit.
 
 
 
Ray Fawkesghoizdoz on December 4th, 2006 03:44 pm (UTC)
Oh yes, we must talk soon.
Pave Kiddyloftwyr on December 4th, 2006 04:17 pm (UTC)
It's not necessarily a sense of entitlement (although there are lots that may have that) so much as a grand illusion over the quality of their work. Mom and their friends has told him/her that they're the greatest artist ever and so they think you've obviously made a mistake.

I think you should cackle in the eminent Dr. Doom style and crush them like the fleas they are. Or then again, maybe not. I'm no good at being in power, even though I've read the Evil Overlord list.
(Deleted comment)
zubkavichzubkavich on December 4th, 2006 04:57 pm (UTC)
That's true and I wish I could impart that more clearly to them but it really is something people tend to experience first hand or not at all... and I'm not even at a spot in my career where I've hauled a supreme amount of ass, so I'm definitely learning too.
Pave Kiddyloftwyr on December 4th, 2006 06:20 pm (UTC)
I think moving cities at least twice, holding down multiple jobs and having a few relationships fail due to overwork might qualify for "hauling a supreme amount of ass"

I could be wrong.
msfrisbymsfrisby on December 4th, 2006 05:39 pm (UTC)
"The tough part comes in understanding how much hard work that will be for some people. If you work hard and you still aren't making it, then a lot more hard work is required. There is no motto that states "Your hard work will be the same or less than anyone else who has ever succeeded". Maybe you have to work twice as hard, maybe aspects of it will come easily - no one knows. Maybe someone you know will get an easy break and you won't. Fate (if you believe in that kind of thing) doesn't state "work hard for a year" or anything specific like that. Your path is unique, even though there are tendencies we can look to as far as growth and technique."

This struck a chord with me. So many people get bitter and resentful that even though they are working hard, they are not succeeding and people who are talented may not have to work nearly as hard and still get rewards. I'm very sorry to say, in the real world, you get very few A's for effort and many more for results.
_ndunderbug on December 4th, 2006 05:45 pm (UTC)
Liar, I've seen your doom machine plans lying around. :P Though i do think it would run better on cat fur static, than say the souls of children and young adults....besides cats are easier to find...though not so much catch.

Rivkah רִבְקָהlilrivkah on December 4th, 2006 06:43 pm (UTC)
The tough part comes in understanding how much hard work that will be for some people. If you work hard and you still aren't making it, then a lot more hard work is required. There is no motto that states "Your hard work will be the same or less than anyone else who has ever succeeded". Maybe you have to work twice as hard, maybe aspects of it will come easily - no one knows. Maybe someone you know will get an easy break and you won't.

That was beautiful and so incredibly true.

As for the "kids these days" . . . *lol* I think it's more the fact that parents don't teach their kids manners anymore. My dad always taught me to say "please" and "thank you" and to not bother him when he's busy. Very few people seem to know patience anymore.

Do you have a form email for anybody who bothers you too early about their applications, do you ignore them, or do you actually try to respond to each of them?
Rivkah רִבְקָהlilrivkah on December 4th, 2006 06:46 pm (UTC)
Ps. I think we all feel relatively self-righteous when we're young. It takes a few good knockings on the head to beat it out of us and then we look back on ourselves later and cringe at what nincompoops we were, prefering to live in denial that we could have ever been like that than face the fact that, yes, we were idiots once, too. :D

Maybe still am to a certain degree . . . ;)
brunorubio: ricky bobbybrunorubio on December 4th, 2006 06:47 pm (UTC)
If it was just Ze Kids, I don't think it would be such a problem.
chrismadmanofprague on December 4th, 2006 08:07 pm (UTC)
Maybe you need a "dude chill out" form letter.
apetersen on December 11th, 2006 04:22 pm (UTC)
You know I'm in Admissions here, and I can tell you that here, there's hard data to support that students and parents contacting us more often to check on their status and for our appeal process.

It's not just you. Students are getting more demanding. If you want any further info about it, do some more searching about their generation ("Millennials" is what I see them called most often).

This article gives some good summary statements about them: "They are smart but impatient. They expect results immediately." Other studies have shown them to be very self-centered: they and their parents think that they're unique and special and should be given individualized attention, even if their actions don't warrant it.

Generalizations, sure, but true in the majority of cases I've seen. They have their good qualities too, of course. It's just that in the admissions process, we more often note their bad when they contact us.

I'd agree with the above commenter that a "dude, chill out" form letter/email might not be a bad idea.